The Common Problems Associated With Sump Pumps

If your home hasn’t experienced flooding even during heavy rains, chances are your sump pump is doing what it’s supposed to. Haven’t heard of a sump pump before? Don’t worry, not very many homeowners have! Still, it’s an important part of your drainage system that will require maintenance and occasional repair—here’s all you need to know about it.

What a Sump Pump Does

Installed in your basement or crawl space, a sump pump is responsible for pushing rainwater and melted snow away from your home. You’ll usually recognize it as a pit in the floor with a pumping device that is connected to a drainpipe outside. Once the pit is filled with water, the mechanism is triggered and pumps the water outside. There are various different types of sump pumps, so you’ll want to consult with a Fort Worth licensed plumber before installing one.

Typical Sump Pump Problems

As with any major appliance or equipment in your home, a sum pump requires regular maintenance and the occasional repair. Here are a few common problems you might run into.

1. Your machine is badly placed

Not every home has the same elevation. If your sump pump isn’t installed in an optimal area in your home, it might be working harder than it has to, which can wear it out quickly. Most sump pumps last an average of 10 years, so if yours dies out way before then, it might not have been installed properly or in an area that damaged its efficiency.

Also, keep in mind that bigger homes will require bigger sump pumps. The recommended minimum size for a sump pump is ⅓ hp.

2. Your machine is jammed

It isn’t uncommon for your sump pump to accidentally suck up some rocks or dirt. However, if left unattended, these blockages can burn out your pump motor. If there is debris in the pit, this can easily be cleaned out manually. If debris finds itself in the pump itself, you might be better off calling up a professional plumbing company in Fort Worth.

Don’t try to fix a jammed pump yourself, otherwise, you’ll be looking at other complications besides overheating.

3. Your float switch is stuck

Sometimes your float switch can get stuck above the water or become submerged in it. If your switch is stuck above it, your pump will think the water level in your pit is higher than it actually is, causing it to overwork itself.

4. Your pump is covered in slime

Large amounts of slime indicate the growth of bacteria. This can cause terrible odors and get in the way of your machine’s functionality. You can easily remedy this on your own by mixing 1 cup of bleach with 3 to 4 liters of water and pouring this into your pump.

When to Repair or Replace Your Sump Pump

If you’re experiencing any of the problems listed above, you might not be sure about whether to handle them yourself, have your sump pump repaired, or replace it altogether. As such, you should call in a professional and have them assess the damage themselves.

Most of the time, a sump pump that is breaking down indicates that it is at the end of its lifespan. Some fixes may be simple, but if you’re experiencing them frequently, it might be time to replace your machine.

Choosing a Replacement Machine

If you were experiencing a lot of problems with your sump pump in its early years, you might’ve purchased a plastic one. Heavy cast iron pumps are far sturdier and sometimes even WiFi-enabled. WiFi-enabled pumps allow you to analyze data according to your machine’s activity, which keeps you two steps ahead of any potential problems.

Conclusion

When it comes to flood prevention, a sump pump makes for an excellent addition to your home. In order to keep it working efficiently throughout the year, be sure to get it serviced on a regular basis.

If you’re looking for Fort Worth plumbers who know exactly what they’re doing, you’ve come to the right professionals! At Lasiter, we arrange anything from new installations, remodels, and repairs.